KHIRKI MASJID PDF

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Telengani Junior lacked the characteristic interest in administration and warfare that his father was renowned for and his only penchant was for architecture and construction. On either side in the foreground are staircases leading to the roof. As if the mosque is surrounded by a moat, the lush green square, in which the gigantic structure is located and which demarcates its existence from the thickly-populated village encircling it, is situated on a considerably lower ground level compared to the surroundings and enclosed by means of a high iron wire mesh.

The mosque itself sits on a high plinth — nearly 3 meters tall — composed of numerous arched chambers that make up the ground floor of the structure; around a score stairs lead up to the rough rectangular entrance composed of trabeates stone ledges of successively increasing size placed atop each other to span space that were a favorite of the affluent Tughlaq nobility. But before heading down the ramp and then up the wide staircase, one is tempted to take a walk around the entire wire enclosure and explore the mosque from all sides — the wire effectively shuts out encroachments and vandals but also wretchedly stifles the mosque structure and leaves not a single side from where one can appreciate or photograph the huge structure in its entirety.

The mosque was the first in India to be shrouded peculiarly by such a massive roof — all other mosques of such grand dimensions usually have open courtyards as congregational areas for the faithful to offer prayers from, or, at the most, colonnades along their peripheries to serve as walkways and shield the visitors from the elements — till date, it is one of the few to display such a markedly distinctive architectural design.

The decision made, we began the circumambulation, it was then that we met Komal, a sweet little girl who resides in a small match-box building divided into numerous quarters immediately overlooking the mosque, who led us upstairs to her narrow terrace from where we could click the mosque — discounting my scared apprehensions about traversing almost 30 feet above ground from one rooftop to another located a couple of feet away my doctor says if I hurt my arm again, it will be permanently damaged!

Komal then took us to one of the highest buildings in the neighborhood and the view from here was, simply put, fascinating — apart from the huge mosque spread majestically below us, we could look over most other rooftops, even see the Saket malls in the background and identify the ancient Satpula dam in a green clearing. Where did she learn to pose like that?! There are rows upon rows of pillars supporting the heavy roof for as far as one can see, the view is regal and spellbinding and it becomes difficult to fathom that even a mosque could be this huge.

And this is less than a quarter of the entire area! But the colonnades flanking each of the four aforementioned courtyards around the center prove an interesting but extremely sharp contrast by facilitating the sudden appearance of shards of blinding sunlight. Photographing the majestic structure is an issue, one cannot understand how to visualize the compositions so as to make them appealing but also do pictorial justice to the numerous pillars and the immensity of the interiors.

The play of light and shadows, though visually spellbinding is difficult to transform into alluring photographs without ignoring the other architectural aspects of the mosque like its striking symmetry or the presence of numerous distinctive stone windows latticed into smaller squares. Fascinatingly vintage! Nearby, a portion of the domed roof along the south-eastern corner has collapsed and lets in patches of sunlight incongruous with the light and dark patterns throughout the rest of the interiors, but nonetheless a welcome relief from the extremely dark, bat-infested conditions; pigeons roost here and prove to be considerably more noisome though remarkably less scary than the sneaky bats.

Two narrow staircases built on either side of the gateway along its internal surface lead upstairs to the roof where one can observe the numerous domes and the etchings and graffiti left by vandals on their blackened surfaces up close and juxtaposed against the spellbindingly uneven skyline of the Khirki village.

The cluster of malls with their reflecting glass panels prove to be an eyesore, blocking out much of the view on one side, but nevertheless appear beckoning with the promise of shade and air conditioning that no one could have possibly refused in this sweltering heat.

We decide to find shelter from the inconceivably brilliant sunshine underneath one of the domed corner towers before proceeding from one corner to the next to click from each of them even though the view was identically similar — in one of these towers, someone had left their treasured stash of kites, while in another were left a few bone dry but perceptibly fresh chappatis Indian bread — indicative that some locals do visit the mosque, even though they might not be aware of its historic or architectural importance.

It might perhaps have been a little bearable were the grassy corners of the wire enclosure not brimming with everyday waste discarded by the village inhabitants besides used electrical equipments and glass and plastic wastes, including a broken tube light on which I stepped unknowingly. The thought itself makes one shudder. Plans are on to lend the colossal congregation area for short plays, book fairs and such besides also housing information kiosks and souvenir shops while the cells along the plinth level could be made available to artists to display and merchandise their work.

The idea is definitely well thought out — for me at least, even the thought of a monument being put to such wonderful uses instead of being relegated to a forgotten, neglected state fills the heart with an inexplicable fascination! Signs of change? It can be accessed by heading down a short stretch of a narrow uneven lane adjacent a makeshift temple more of a wall with red painted bricks and a few idols at the side of the Press Enclave road.

Walk from the Khirki village bus stop couple of hundred meters away from the mosque or take an auto for Rs 50 from the metro station to the malls and walk from there on. Relevant Links -.

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Telengani Junior lacked the characteristic interest in administration and warfare that his father was renowned for and his only penchant was for architecture and construction. On either side in the foreground are staircases leading to the roof. As if the mosque is surrounded by a moat, the lush green square, in which the gigantic structure is located and which demarcates its existence from the thickly-populated village encircling it, is situated on a considerably lower ground level compared to the surroundings and enclosed by means of a high iron wire mesh. The mosque itself sits on a high plinth — nearly 3 meters tall — composed of numerous arched chambers that make up the ground floor of the structure; around a score stairs lead up to the rough rectangular entrance composed of trabeates stone ledges of successively increasing size placed atop each other to span space that were a favorite of the affluent Tughlaq nobility. But before heading down the ramp and then up the wide staircase, one is tempted to take a walk around the entire wire enclosure and explore the mosque from all sides — the wire effectively shuts out encroachments and vandals but also wretchedly stifles the mosque structure and leaves not a single side from where one can appreciate or photograph the huge structure in its entirety. The mosque was the first in India to be shrouded peculiarly by such a massive roof — all other mosques of such grand dimensions usually have open courtyards as congregational areas for the faithful to offer prayers from, or, at the most, colonnades along their peripheries to serve as walkways and shield the visitors from the elements — till date, it is one of the few to display such a markedly distinctive architectural design. The decision made, we began the circumambulation, it was then that we met Komal, a sweet little girl who resides in a small match-box building divided into numerous quarters immediately overlooking the mosque, who led us upstairs to her narrow terrace from where we could click the mosque — discounting my scared apprehensions about traversing almost 30 feet above ground from one rooftop to another located a couple of feet away my doctor says if I hurt my arm again, it will be permanently damaged!

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Talk:Khirki Mosque

History[ edit ] Khan-i-Jahan Junaan Telangani and Feroz Shah Tughlaq were intensely committed towards building architectural monuments. Together, they planned and built several tombs, forts and mosques. Telangani in particular, was credited with building seven monuments of unique designs. Constructed in the Jahapanah city, it is a novel cross—axial mosque in Tughluqian architectural style. Therefore, in the absence of "epigraphic and literary" evidence though one recent web reference mentions and another for its provenance, a research study has been provided by Welch and Howard in their paper titled "The Tughluqs: Master Builders of the Delhi Sultanate".

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Khirki Mosque

Today, we will talk about the strange things that have happened at and around the Khirki Mosque, one of the four built by Telangani that have survived. I first visited it on a cold winter morning in I was able to see it because a gentleman I had to meet at Hauz Rani was late in reaching his shop and I am grateful to him for his lack of punctuality. I remembered the mosque, asked for directions and soon at the threshold of this magnificent structure.

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